Villas in Rural Andalucia

Due in part to the relatively mild winter and spring climate, the south of Spain is attractive to overseas visitors–especially tourists from Northern Europe. While inland areas such as Jaén, Córdoba and the hill villages and towns remain relatively untouched by tourism, the coastal areas of Andalusia have heavy visitor traffic for much of the year.

 

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Andalusia has three major geographic subregions. In the north, the mountainous Sierra Morena separates Andalusia from the the plains of Extremadura and Castile-La Mancha on Spain's Meseta Central. South of that, the one can distinguish Upper Andalusia—generally the Baetic Cordillera—from Lower Andalusia—the Baetic Depression of the valley of the Guadalquivir.
Since the Industrial Revolution, Andalusia has been an economically poor region in comparison with the rest of Spain or of today's European Union at large. Agriculture and the service sectors predominate in the ecomomy. The region has, however, a rich culture and a strong cultural identity. Many cultural phenomena that are seen internationally as distinctively Spanish—for example, flamenco, bullfighting, and certain Muslim-influenced architectural styles—are largely or entirely Andalusian in origin.

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Good, 7.4 Score from 172 reviews

Abetos del Maestre Escuela  

Córdoba Andalucia

Set 15 minutes’ drive from Córdoba city centre, Abetos del Maestre Escuela offers rooms with balconies.
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Surrounded by gardens, the Maestre Escuela has a peaceful setting. It features a traditional Andalusian interior courtyard and a terrace with mountain views.

Breakfast is served in the Escuela’s café. You can enjoy a drink on the terrace or in the hotel bar.

Hotel Rooms: 36

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Very good, 8.1 Score from 344 reviews

Apartamentos Turísticos La Castilleja    

Córdoba Andalucia

Apartamentos Turísticos La Castilleja are located 5 km from the centre of Córdoba. This complex features a seasonal outdoor swimming pool, free Wi-Fi and apartments with flat-screen TVs. There is 1 person looking at these apartments. More

The Castilleja’s apartments and studios are brightly decorated and air conditioned. Each has a kitchenette with a microwave, fridge and hob, and they have heating.

There is a small selection of restaurants and bars in the area surrounding the hotel. There are also shops nearby.

The apartments offer free parking, and there is a bus stop 150 metres away, providing easy access to central Córdoba, including the famous Mezquita. Córdoba Airport is 25 minutes’ drive from the apartments.

 

 

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Dreamy harbour towns, cultural metropolises with a Moorish past, Christian buildings and white villages. Beauty in the Garden Of Eden -- that's Andalusia

Andalusia in southern Spain is a fantasy land situated between Europe and Africa. In Algarrobo, a white village close to the coast, time seems to have stood still. A place of both inspiration and contemplation. Since Phoenician times the earlier 'Malaca' was a busy trading port that was defended by the Castillo De Gibralforo. The Cathedral, also known as 'La Manquita', symbolises a catholic victory on the former site of a mosque. On the edge of the city centre is the Moorish fortress of Alcazaba that was once a fortified residence on the hills of Castillo. The second largest city in Andalusia also became known as the birthplace of its famous son, world famous artist Pablo Ruiz Picasso. Since the 1950's the modern coastal resort of Torremolinos has attracted mass tourism with a numerous variety of huge hotel skyscrapers, bars and restaurants.

In the hilly inland area of the Costa Del Sol is the pretty white mountain village of Mijas. A small hilltop bullfight arena shines bright white along with the houses of the surrounding area. Marbella, the prima donna of the Costa Del Sol, serves as a rendezvous for the stars of stage and screen and a leisure resort for the international jet set. Another short excursion into the mountains near the coast leads to Casares, a sleepy mountain village crowned by the ruins of a Moorish Castle. During the Roman Carthaginian Wars Cadiz played an important role as a trading centre. After the Moors, came the Normans and in 1262, the city fell into the hands of the Christian king, Alfonso. Dreamy harbour towns, cultural metropolises with a Moorish past, Christian buildings and white villages. Beauty in the Garden Of Eden -- that's Andalusia!


Rural Andalucia.

 

Tourism in Andalusia

City of Úbeda.
City of Úbeda.
Nerja. Beach
 Nerja. Beach

La Rábida Monastery, Palos de la Frontera, province of Huelva.

La Rábida Monastery, Palos de la Frontera, province of Huelva.
Nerja.

View of Ronda.

View of Ronda.

Due in part to the relatively mild winter and spring climate, the south of Spain is attractive to overseas visitors–especially tourists from Northern Europe. While inland areas such as Jaén, Córdoba and the hill villages and towns remain relatively untouched by tourism, the coastal areas of Andalusia have heavy visitor traffic for much of the year.
Among the autonomous communities, Andalusia is second only to Catalonia in tourism, with nearly 30 million visitors every year. The principal tourist destinations in Andalusia are the Costa del Sol and (secondarily) the Sierra Nevada. As discussed, Andalusia is one of the sunniest and warmest places in Europe, making it a center of "sun and sand" tourism. 70 percent of the lodging capacity and 75 percent of the nights booked in Andalusian hotels are in coastal municipalities. The largest number of tourists come in August—13.26 percent of the nights booked throughout the year—and the smallest number in December—5.36 percent.
On the west (Atlantic) coast are the Costa de la Luz (provinces of Huelva and Cádiz), and on the east (Mediterranean) coast, the Costa del Sol (provinces of Cádiz y Málaga), Costa Tropical (Granada and part of Almería) and the Costa de Almería. In 2004, the Blue Flag beach program of the non-profit Foundation for Environmental Education recognized 66 Andalusian beaches and 18 pleasure craft ports as being in a good state of conservation in terms of sustainability, accessibility, and quality. Nonetheless, the level of tourism on the Andalusian coasts has been high enough to have a significant environmental impact, and other organizations—such as the Spanish Ecologists in Action (Ecologistas en Acción) with their description of "Black Flag beaches" or Greenpeace—have expressed the opposite sentiment.
Together with "sand and sun" tourism, there has also been a strong increase in nature tourism in the interior, as well as cultural tourism, sport tourism, and conventions. One example of sport and nature tourism is the ski resort at Sierra Nevada National Park.
As for cultural tourism, Andalusia has some notable monuments dating back to the Muslim era: the Great Mosque of Córdoba (now a cathedral), the Alhambra in Granada and the Giralda in Seville. There are hundreds of cultural tourist destinations: cathedrals, castles, forts, monasteries, and historic city centers; the city centers of Úbeda and Baeza in the province of Jaén are UNESCO World Heritage Sites.
Each of the provinces shows a great variety of architectural styles: Islamic architecture, Renaissance architecture, Baroque architecture and more modern styles. Further, there are the Lugares colombinos, significant places in the life of Christopher Columbus: Palos de la Frontera, La Rábida Monastery, and Moguer) in the province of Huelva. There are also archeological sites of great interest: the Roman city of Italica, birthplace of Emperor Trajan and (most likely) Hadrian; Baelo Claudia near the Straits of Gibraltar; Medina Azahara, the city-palace of the Cordoban caliph Abd-ar-Rahman III, where major excavations still continue.
Andalusia was the birthplace of such great painters as Velázquez and Murillo (Seville) and, more recently, Picasso (Málaga); Murillo and Picasso are each memorialized by museums in their native cities (the Museo Casa de Murillo and Fundación Picasso and Museo Picasso Málaga). There are numerous other significant museums around the region, both of paintings and of archeological artifacts such as gold jewelry, pottery and other ceramics, and other works that demonstrate the region's artisanal traditions.
The Council of Government has designated the following "Municipios Turísticos": in Almería, Roquetas de Mar; in Cádiz,Chiclana de la Frontera, Chipiona, Conil de la Frontera, Grazalema, Rota, and Tarifa; in Granada, Almuñécar; in Huelva, Aracena; in Jaén, Cazorla; in Málaga, Benalmádena, Fuengirola, Nerja, Rincón de la Victoria, Ronda, and Torremolinos; in Seville, Santiponce.

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31,46,20,28

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Villas in Rural Andalucia